CARIM at Tikapa Moana

Discussions with Ngāti Pāoa and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei iwi members led to a hui at Wharekawa (Kaiaua) Marae. There was excellent interaction between the scientists and local iwi members in discussing the issues and evidence around acidification in Tikapa Moana. We look forward to progressing this collaborative relationship as CARIM unfolds. Check back here for updates.

 
 
 A well attended hui has been an important starting point for discussions with iwi members.

A well attended hui has been an important starting point for discussions with iwi members.

Two way engagement is an important part of CARIM

A hui with iwi members from Ngāti Paoa and also Ngāti Whanaunga was well attended. After a moving welcome to the marae, CARM scientists and iwi members discussed coastal acidification - both the issues and the evidence.

Local iwi members were highly concerned about the impacts of ocean acidification. Their local experience with respect to kaimoana will be an important contribution to CARIM in this area, as the input into the hui from iwi members clearly demonstrated.

 

 
 Dr Mary Sewell from University of Auckland explains her planned research in CARIM.

Dr Mary Sewell from University of Auckland explains her planned research in CARIM.

Several CARIM scientists spoke at the hui

CARIM scientists including Dr Mary Sewell (University of Auckland), Dr Cliff Law and Dr John Zeldis (NIWA) spoke about the CARIM programme of work and in particular the Tikapa Moana context at the hui. Dr Victoria Metcalf outlined engagement plans. 

 
 Comparison of erosion of empty paua shells (i.e. without the live animal) after four months in low pH (7.65; shell on the right), and ambient pH seawater (shell on the left).

Comparison of erosion of empty paua shells (i.e. without the live animal) after four months in low pH (7.65; shell on the right), and ambient pH seawater (shell on the left).

Concerns about kaimoana

Local iwi members outlined their observations about changes in the kaimoana in Tikapa Moana in recent years. This was particularly interesting discussion.

There was concern about the impacts of land-based activities on shellfish stocks.

We hope to conduct joint sampling and create Te Reo resources in the future.