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Want to get involved?

The pages below outline ways in which you can get involved in CARIM, as well as sharing how we are engaging with iwi in study site regions to make CARIM a truly collaborative project.

Join us on our journey of discovery about coastal acidification rate, impacts and management in New Zealand.

 

Staying Connected

We'd like all New Zealanders, and especially those living near our study regions (Firth of Thames/Tikapa Moana, Nelson and Karitane, to feel connected to what CARIM is doing and able to contribute to the conversation around this project.

Ways to do this include:

Ocean guardians/kaitiaki moana

We also have a Facebook Group - the Ocean Guardians Community.

The Ocean Guardians/Kaitiaki Moana Community Group is an online space for people interested in CARIM to come together to share ideas, support each other and have input into the science CARIM is doing. We'd love for you to join us there.

People in the Firth of Thames, Karitane and Nelson Bays might be especially interested in joining, but membership of the group is at present open to anyone within New Zealand or internationally.

The Ocean Guardians/Kaitiaki Moana outreach programme will also operate in the Firth of Thames, Karitane and Nelson region. It will offer chances for community members, including schools, to connect with the CARIM project and the scientists, attend CARIM events and contribute input into the project. For further details, ask us a question via the Facebook Group or alternatively head to the Contact page for further contact options.  

The CARIM team is actively working with iwi in two of our study areas. This collaborative approach is allowing joint sampling work, the sharing of plans and findings by the scientists, as well as input into the project from iwi. We also aim to produce some Te Reo resources on ocean acidification in the future.

Incorporating Mātauranga Māori into CARIM will enrich the project and its outcomes. 

As the project proceeds our progress in this space will be updated in these pages.

 

CARIM at Tikapa Moana

Discussions with Ngāti Pāoa and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei iwi members led to a hui at Wharekawa (Kaiaua) Marae. There was excellent interaction between the scientists and local iwi members in discussing the issues and evidence around acidification in Tikapa Moana. We look forward to progressing this collaborative relationship as CARIM unfolds. Check back here for updates.

 
 
A well attended hui has been an important starting point for discussions with iwi members.

A well attended hui has been an important starting point for discussions with iwi members.

Two way engagement is an important part of carim

A hui with iwi members from Ngāti Paoa and also Ngāti Whanaunga was well attended. After a moving welcome to the marae, CARM scientists and iwi members discussed coastal acidification - both the issues and the evidence.

Local iwi members were highly concerned about the impacts of ocean acidification. Their local experience with respect to kaimoana will be an important contribution to CARIM in this area, as the input into the hui from iwi members clearly demonstrated.

 

 
Dr Mary Sewell from University of Auckland explains her planned research in CARIM.

Dr Mary Sewell from University of Auckland explains her planned research in CARIM.

several CARIM SCIENTISTS SPOKE AT THE HUI

CARIM scientists including Dr Mary Sewell (University of Auckland), Dr Cliff Law and Dr John Zeldis (NIWA) spoke about the CARIM programme of work and in particular the Tikapa Moana context at the hui. Dr Victoria Metcalf outlined engagement plans. 

 
A normal paua shell compared with a shell of an animal that had been through a simulated ocean acidification experiment.

A normal paua shell compared with a shell of an animal that had been through a simulated ocean acidification experiment.

concerns about kaimoana

Local iwi members outlined their observations about changes in the kaimoana in Tikapa Moana in recent years. This was particularly interesting discussion.

There was concern about the impacts of land-based activities on shellfish stocks.

We hope to conduct joint sampling and create Te Reo resources in the future.

 

CARIM at Karitane

Discussions with the Puketeraki Nga Waka Club and Ngai Tahu about CARIM have assisted the location and the maintenance of pH sensors and sampling at Karitane. We expect to further develop this collaborative relationship as the project proceeds.

We're thrilled to be working in this way on this project. Check back here for updates as the project progresses.

 
 
Heading out to the Karitane monitoring site.

Heading out to the Karitane monitoring site.

WAKA TRAVEL

A distinctive element of sampling at Karitane is the use of waka to travel to the monitoring site to collect samples. The combination of using traditional transportation methods with modern science is aiding engagement and community participation in this location.

 
Installing monitoring equipment at Karitane

Installing monitoring equipment at Karitane

MONITORING AT KARITANE

Divers were used to install monitoring equipment to look at ocean conditions (including pH and temperature) during the CARIM project.

 
Karitane Beach is punctuated at the northern end by a historically important point.

Karitane Beach is punctuated at the northern end by a historically important point.

MONITORING LOCATION

The region of the sea beyond the point at Karitane is ecologically, culturally and economically important  to local residents. This is also where our sampling and monitoring focus is.